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Annual University Alumni Award Recipients Named

My Carolina Alumni Association announced the 2013 recipients of the University of South Carolina’s highest honors to six University alumni and supporters. The award recipients will be honored throughout My Carolina Homecoming presented by Lowe’s activities on November 1-2.

Dr. Todd Crump ’92 M. Ed., ’98 M.D., is the 2013 recipient of the Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award, which is given to an outstanding alumnus or alumna who serves others in a manner beyond that required by the individual’s job or profession. Dr. Crump is an emergency medicine physician who works full time for the Lexington Medical Center. He also volunteers as the medical director of the Free Medical Clinic in Columbia, assisting many in receiving healthcare which they may not otherwise be able to afford.

William P. Kennedy, ’66, and Lou W. Kennedy, ’84
, are the 2013 recipients of the Distinguished Alumni Awards. The award is presented each year to the alumnus or alumna who not only exemplifies devotion to the University, but also outstanding professional leadership and citizenship. The couple own Nephron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., in Orlando, FL, and are devoted philanthropists to higher education, in addition to many other causes.

Receiving the Outstanding Black Alumni Award is Dr. Toby S. Jenkins, ’97. The award is presented to an alumnus or alumna with a record of excellence in his or her chosen field. Dr. Jenkins is an Assistant Professor of Higher Education at the University of Hawaii Manoa. Diagnosed with both breast cancer and lupus in 2009, Dr. Jenkins is more than just a survivor, but someone who lives with a passion. She has built a career providing cultural programs and community initiatives to under-represented ethnic markets.

Dr. Williams R. Jennings, ’03 M.D.
, will be honored with the Outstanding Young Alumni Award, which goes to a graduate under the age of 40 who has excelled in his or her chosen field. Dr. Jennings is a practicing, board-certified, emergency medicine physician at Palmetto Health Richland Hospital. He currently serves as a System Vice President at Palmetto Health and Informatics Director for the Palmetto Health Quality Collaborative. Additionally, he serves as Medical Director for the South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services.

The Honorary Life Member Award is presented by the alumni association to non-alumni who support and serve the University. This year’s recipient is John Bachmann. Bachmann is a Senior Partner at Edward D. Jones & Co., LP, in Saint Louis, Missouri, where he has worked since 1959. During his tenure, Edward Jones grew from 200 offices in 28 states to more than 9,000 offices throughout the U.S., Canada and the United Kingdom. Mr. Bachmann serves on the Board of Trustees of the Business Partnership Foundation of the Moore School of Business as well as many other boards and commissions.

For additional details for My Carolina Homecoming presented by Lowe’s activities, please visit www.MyCarolina.org/homecoming.



2013 Award Recipients


Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award – Todd Crump, ’92 M. Ed., ’98 M.D.

Dr. Todd Crump has dedicated his career in service to others.  Dr. Crump is an emergency medicine physician who works full time for the Lexington Medical Center in South Carolina. He also volunteers as the medical director of the Free Medical Clinic in Columbia. Additionally, he serves as a mentor to pre-medical and medical students and has been previously honored as the Distinguished Young Physician Alumni Award in 2004 by the USC School of Medicine.  In addition to his many other honors and awards,   he was also the 2013 recipient of the School of Medicine’s Humanitarian Alumni Award.

“I am honored and humbled to receive such recognition for doing what I am called to do, and love doing,” Dr. Crump says. “I went into medicine so that I could apply the knowledge and skills passed onto me by my professors and mentors to make a difference in the lives of others.  Nowhere is that more important than in our patients who have limited or no access to healthcare.

Whether in The Free Medical Clinic or in the Emergency Department, I provide care for patients when they are most vulnerable and in need.  It is in those encounters that I have the opportunity to heal, establish trust, provide support, and most of all give hope to those who may be at the end of their rope.  And I strive to treat ‘the least of these’ the way I would want my own family members to be treated:  with respect, dignity and compassion.  Practicing medicine within that context enables me to provide a positive, patient-focused experience, and it also motivates me to persevere in ensuring that the poor in spirit and health will always have hope in healing.”

Volunteering at the Free Medical Clinic since 1997, Dr. Crump works long hours helping to insure that those who cannot afford medical service get the help they need. He is involved in numerous fundraising activities for this and other causes. He was also active in the Hurricane Katrina Medical Missions Trip to Louisiana in September of 2005, treating evacuees from the disaster while also chartering a jet to transport medical supplies and personnel to assist in the relief efforts.

He has served on many boards including My Carolina Alumni Association’s Council of Alumni Societies and USC’s Board of Governors, and he is a member of the Alumni Association.

“My Carolina is walking the long hallways at the School of Medicine with my classmates who are now lifelong friends and professional colleagues; spending days and nights studying in the School of Medicine Library; and always making time for intramural sports or a day of tailgating and football at Williams-Brice,” Dr. Crump says.

Dr. Crump earned a Bachelor of Business Administration degree from the University of Miami in 1990 before earning his Master of Education in Student Personnel Services from the University of South Carolina in 1992, and his Doctor of Medicine degree from the USC School of Medicine in 1998.

Distinguished Alumni Award – William P. Kennedy, ’66, & Lou W. Kennedy, ‘84

Bill and Lou Kennedy are devoted philanthropists to higher education as well as many other causes. The couple owns Nephron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., in Orlando, FL.  Bill earned his B.S. in Pharmacy from the University of South Carolina in 1966. Lou Kennedy is a 1984 graduate with a B.A. in Journalism and Mass Communications. In addition to her work with Nephron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., she is the owner of Glenn Springs Management Company. They are both Life Members of My Carolina Alumni Association, which has been one of the many enduring connections they’ve had with the University.

“To me, My Carolina is firmly rooted in my experiences with the Alpha Tau Omega fraternity and my education from the pharmacy school,” Bill says. “Without that foundation, I wouldn't be able to give back to the institution that gave me so much.”

Lou adds to the sentiment by saying "My Carolina reminds me of meeting for lunch at The Winner's Circle, visiting with friends across the Humanities bridge before class, completing a journalism degree that I use each and every day, tailgating on Saturdays and now, sharing my love of the Gamecock nation with my daughter and husband.”

The Kennedys are responsible for locating a manufacturing facility to Lexington, South Carolina, to bring economic benefit to the state.  It is expected to create as many as 700 jobs and will be completed in 2014. In addition to personal philanthropy, the Kennedy’s have been committed to the University by volunteer efforts with the University’s capital campaign, Carolina’s Promise.  Mr. Kennedy is a member of the campaign committee and is the campaign chairman for USC Pharmacy. Mrs. Kennedy serves on the building committee for the College of Mass Communications and is a member of the Garnet Way cabinet.

“My husband Bill and I were thrilled to be the recipients of this award, and humbled when we learned of the past honorees.  As my nickname, ‘CockadoodleLou’ indicates, anytime I am able to be affiliated with the University that we both love, it is truly an honor,” Lou says.

Throughout his career, Mr. Kennedy excelled as an independent pharmacist. Recognizing an emerging need to assist the elderly and home-bound population, he successfully pursued a mail-order pharmacy model which resulted in the creation of a billion dollar corporation which he sold in 1997. This was the foundation for him to realize his dream of becoming a pharmaceutical manufacturer and led him to the purchase of the then small company named Nephron Pharmaceuticals Corporation.

Lou Kennedy, a native of Columbia, established herself as a top management, marketing, and public relations professional for a national children’s care and development company. After meeting Bill at a Carolina football game, she would join Nephron in 2001 to oversee its sales force. The couple later established a separate company, Home 2 U Oxygen, aimed at providing assistance to homebound patients with respiratory needs. The company experienced outstanding success and was sold in less than two years for $60 million. Since 2007, Nephron has grown substantially and has undergone and multi-million dollar expansion.

Outstanding Black Alumni Award – Dr. Toby S. Jenkins, ‘97

Dr. Toby Jenkins is paying it forward. As both a cancer survivor and someone who values her educational experiences, she is dedicated to seeing others overcome obstacles and achieve greatness.

“I am extremely surprised and honored,” says Dr. Toby Jenkins, ’97, about receiving the 2013 Outstanding Black Alumni Award.  “To be honored by the major university in my home state is meaningful.  Regardless of how much others appreciate you, it is always most meaningful to be appreciated at home. USC gave me a lot. I went to the university on a full academic scholarship. It makes me feel good to see that the investment made in that education is valued and the university feels that I have made them proud.”

Dr. Jenkins is an Assistant Professor of Higher Education at the University of Hawaii Manoa. Diagnosed with both breast cancer and lupus in 2009, Dr. Jenkins is more than just a survivor, but someone who lives with a passion. She has built a career providing key cultural programs and community initiatives to under-represented ethnic markets.

“So 2009 was a very tough year,” Dr. Jenkins says.  “But it taught me some incredible lessons: To slow down and make time to take care of myself. Eating well, exercising, resting, and laughing. Our health allows us to be everything that we are; professionals, parents, friends, leaders. You can’t be any of those things if you lose your health. I completely changed my lifestyle. It also taught me to make time for friends and family.”

Friends and family made time for her in her time of need, including her sorority sisters from Delta Sigma Theta at USC.

“We pledged 17 years ago, but when I was diagnosed, these women who are spread out all over the country managed to get together and send me one huge care box with a gift and a handwritten personal note from each woman inside,” Dr. Jenkins says. “It was full of their different personalities. One gave a spiritual book, another an outrageous ring so that I could be fabulous during chemo. There were about 28 little gifts like these from the 28 women who pledged with me as young college students in 1996. The love is still there and we have seen each other through so much in life.”

In addition to her current post, Dr. Jenkins has brought her talents to University of Maryland, Penn State University, and George Mason University.

Dr. Jenkins, a Columbia native, earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Public Relations from the University of South Carolina in 1997. She received her Master’s in College Student Personnel Services from the University of Maryland, College Park in 2000 and completed her doctoral studies in Educational Theory & Policy/Social Foundations of Education at Penn State University in 2007. Dr. Jenkins has spent more than a decade working as an administrator and diversity practitioner in higher education.

With all of her accomplishments, she is most proud of the effect that she can have on people. This includes a former student named Sammy whose drug addicted parents were killed when he was very young and he spent his life in and out of foster care. At times he was homeless in New York City.  Still he managed to go to college while living in a group home for homeless young adults.

“A close colleague of mine worked at the college and was concerned about what Sammy would do when he graduated and where would he go,” Dr. Jenkins says. “So, I got involved and helped Sammy to get into grad school at Penn State.  He served as my graduate assistant there for two years and earned his master’s degree.  He is now working as an educational administrator for the same youth advocacy program in which he participated as a teen. That is the ethic behind my work and what I teach--for us to use our talents, achievements, and abilities to help the communities from which we come. Sammy is married with two children and has created a solid career and healthy family life for himself. Knowing that I helped that to happen brings me so much joy.”

Prior to her recent post, she served for four years as an Assistant Professor of Higher Education & Integrative Studies at George Mason. She spent five years at Penn State University where she oversaw the implementation of the strategic vision for Paul Robeson Cultural Center. This included building a new programming framework to guide the creation and delivery of cultural programs, significant fundraising efforts, student outreach efforts, facility enhancements, and administrative policy changes.  Jenkins expanded the cultural center's reach beyond campus and into local, regional, and global communities.

Previously, Jenkins worked at the University of Maryland within Academic Affairs as Assistant Director of the Nyumburu Cultural Center. She also served as a Program Manager within the College of Education conducting research assessment and creating mentoring outreach programs to local K-12 schools in the Institute for Urban and Minority Education. In 2000, Jenkins created the Joint Service Project, bringing together college students, faculty, and staff in service efforts within the local community and in 2001 she created the Vision Cultural Mentoring Initiative providing college mentors and interactive cultural experiences for local high school students at low performing schools in Prince Georges County. Both programs received honors from the President of the United States and the Governor of Maryland.

Dr. Jenkins past professional experience as a student affairs staff member with Semester at Sea as well as her individual research projects and studies have taken her to over 20 countries including Greece, Spain, Norway, Italy, Morocco, Egypt, Russia, Belgium, Turkey, South Africa, Senegal, England, France, Costa Rica,  Jamaica, and Trinidad. Additionally, she worked with students from over 40 countries as the resident life director for the Johns Hopkins University Office of Summer Programs.

Outstanding Young Alumni Award – Dr. William R. Jennings, ’03 M.D.

Dr. William R. “Tripp” Jennings is a practicing, board-certified, emergency medicine physician at Palmetto Health Richland Hospital. He currently serves as a System Vice President at Palmetto Health and Informatics Director for the Palmetto Health Quality Collaborative. Additionally, he serves as Medical Director for the South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services.  He has earned numerous awards in his field including the 2013 Young Physician Award from the USC School of Medicine. A national leader in the field of medical informatics, Dr. Jennings has lectured all over the United States.

He graduated from the School of Medicine in 2003 after earning his undergraduate degree from the College of Charleston. He has also earned a Graduate Certificate in Biomedical Informatics from Oregon Health and Science University in 2011.

"I am sincerely honored to be recognized by an institution that has given so much to me and that I hold in such high regard," Dr. Jennings says.

Dr. Jennings was President of his medical school class, chief resident of his emergency residency program at Palmetto Health, and also served as a faculty member for the Palmetto Health’s Wilderness Medicine course. He is a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Surgery at the USC School of Medicine. In addition to patient care and teaching in the emergency department, he is a fellow of the American College of Emergency Physicians, serving as President for the South Carolina chapter from 2009-2011. During that time he helped shape legislation affecting the practice of medicine through his work with state legislators.

Honorary Life Member Award – John Bachmann

John Bachmann is a Senior Partner at Edward D. Jones & Co., LP, in Saint Louis, Missouri, where he has worked since 1959. He has previously served as the Chief Financial Officer and prior to that was Managing Partner from 1980-2003. During his tenure, Edward Jones grew from 200 offices in 28 states to more than 9,000 offices throughout the U.S., Canada and the United Kingdom.

“The University of South Carolina, at a time when so many schools are struggling, is thriving,” Bachmann says.  “It is a wonderful resource to South Carolina and far beyond.  Nothing reflects this more than the world renowned Moore School.  To be a tiny part of it is both a pleasure and an honor. For me personally, to be able to meet with some of the brightest, most able rising managers in our ‘Lessons for Leaders’ course is as great a learning experience for me as for my students.

Mr. Bachmann serves on the Board of Trustees of the Business Partnership Foundation of the Moore School of Business as well as a member of the Board of Governors for the Chicago Stock Exchange.

He also serves as Canadian Honorary Consul in Missouri; emeritus trustee of Wabash College; chairman of the Board of Visitors of the Peter F. Drucker Center and trustee of the Claremont Graduate University; trustee of Washington University in St. Louis; director of AMR Corporation, American Airlines, Inc. and director, Missouri Baptist Medical Center.

Bachmann earned his bachelor’s degree in economics from Wabash College in Indiana in 1960 and his Master’s in Business Administration from Northwestern University in 1962.

Additionally, Mr. Bachmann served as director, The Monsanto Company; chairman, U.S. Chamber of Commerce; chairman, Executive Committee of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce; chairman, Securities Industry Association; campaign chairman, United Way of Greater St. Louis; chairman, St. Louis Regional Chamber and Growth Association; chairman, St. Louis Symphony Orchestra; and commissioner, St. Louis Science Center.


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